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2 edition of Studies on the growth and development of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus). found in the catalog.

Studies on the growth and development of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus).

Mohamed Elhassan Fadl Alla Mohamed

Studies on the growth and development of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus).

by Mohamed Elhassan Fadl Alla Mohamed

  • 263 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M. Agr.)--The Queen"s University of Belfast, 1982.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20224294M

Yellow and Purple nutsedge are perennial plants. They usually die back in the fall as temperatures decrease and the tubers and rhizomes of the plant survive in the soil to sprout the next spring. Tubers are usually in the top 6 inches of the soil and can remain dormant for up to three years before germinating. The effects of soil temperature on yellow nutsedge, purple nutsedge, and root-knot nematode development. Proceedings, Western Society of Weed Science in press. Schroeder, J., B. J. Greenfield, S. H. Thomas, L. W. Murray, and J. M. Fuchs. Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) increase early season growth of purple and yellow nutsedgeFile Size: 49KB.

purple nutsedge tubers formed a much larger patch that was sparsely populated (relative to yellow nutsedge). After 6 months of growth, the purple nutsedge patch expanded to an area of 84 ft 2 ( m), over fold larger than the yellow nutsedge patch. In this particular purple nutsedge patch, there were. Start studying weed science exam 1 SG. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. (yellow nutsedge, purple nutsedge) simple and creeping perennial. S- mainly reproduce by seed. occurs when one plant releases some chemical that interferes with the growth and development of another plant. weed.

  Field studies were used in / and / to investigate 'Black Plastic', 'Weed Barrier' and 'Pine Bark Nugget' (treatments) for purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) control in field-grown feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium). Purple Nutsedge Growth Model. Both and field studies were held in mid-summer, June through August, the optimal season for purple nutsedge growth, with high temperature and radiation conditions. Vigorous purple nutsedge growth was reflected in the biomass and LCA values (Figures 1a and 1b).Cited by:


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Studies on the growth and development of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) by Mohamed Elhassan Fadl Alla Mohamed Download PDF EPUB FB2

Growth, development and carbohydrate distribution in successively developing shoots and underground parts of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) are described on the basis of three consecutive years of experiments in pot culture. Emphasis has been laid on the contribution of successively developing aerial shoots to the overall process of tuber development Author: P N Singh, S B Singh.

Additionally, based on the results of the greenhouse study a field study was conducted at the University of Florida West Florida Research and Education Center near Jay, FL to investigate pre-conditioning purple nutsedge with plant growth promotors to facilitate its. In each experiment, the growth and development of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) were assessed.

The first experiment was developed between March and July (decreasing photoperiod), while the second one was developed between August and November of the same year (increasing photoperiod).Cited by: 1. Greenhouse studies evaluated the growth and tuber production of purple nutsedge and yellow nutsedge grown in pots covered with black-opaque polyethylene mulch, clear-colorless polyethylene mulch, or nonmulched.

PDF | On Jan 1,Duraisamy Ravisankar and others published Study on Purple Nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) Tuber Dormancy and its Control Through Combined Application of Growth Regulator and. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the purple nutsedge tuber dormancy and assessment of combined application of growth regulators along with herbicides for its early growth control.

In experiment-1, tuber dormancy study was carried out in two methods viz., selection of different size of the. Growth and reproduction of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) were studied for proper timings in the mechanical and chemical control measures. Changes of carohydrate contents both in the aerial and underground parts were also determined throughout the growing season to find the extent of sugar transport for the vegetative reproduction below the ground.

The results of experiments on the sprouting and growth of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) in relation to pH and aeration are described. All pH levels between to allowed high sprouting. PRE herbicides and POST halosulfuron for purple nutsedge control in tomato grown in plasticulture systems - Jialin Yu, Shaun S.

Sharpe, Nathan S. Boyd. Purple nutsedge, (Cyperus rotundus L.), a native of India is a pernicious perennial weed in many crops in more than 90 tropical and subtropical countries and is ranked as one of world's worst weeds. It asserts allelopathic effects on crop plants through inhibition of germination.

Rogers and colleagues () tested the effects of a rise in atmospheric CO2 on purple nutsedge in controlled studies. Purple nutsedge exposed to elevated CO2 had greater total dry weight, leaf area, root length and numbers of tubers and tended to increase allocation belowground, which led to greater root-to-shoot ratio (R:S).File Size: 1MB.

In the United States, purple nutsedge infests cultivated fields, waste areas, roadsides, pastures, and natural areas. It is considered a headache for the southern gardener because of its insidious, rapid growth in flowerbeds and vegetable gardens.

Purple nutsedge produces an extensive system of underground tubers from which they can regenerate. The growth of both nutsedge species responded positively to elevated CO 2, purple nutsedge had increased shoot and root dry weights and yellow nutsedge had increased shoot, root, and tuber dry weights and by: Purple nutsedge control in these studies was influenced by glyphosate rate, purple nutsedge growth stage, and application timing.

Furthermore, similar levels of purple nutsedge control were observed in fallow and glyphosate-tolerant cotton. Yellow Nutsedge will produce a small tuber, the size of a baby pea, at the end of a rhizome.

Purple nutsedge will produce several tubers in a row along a single rhizome. These tubers grow within a few inches of the mother plant and are the primary method of plant reproduction. Each tuber can produce up to 3 new plants.

study was at least in part due to the shorter days during the winter months. Purple nutsedge is a C4 plant and photosyn-thetically efficient (1) and reaches its maximum growth during periods of high light intensity and warm temperatures.

During such periods of. Both weeds infest crop production areas in tropical and temperate climates, causing large losses in crop yields. While both species proliferate in the warm regions of the world, yellow nutsedge inhabits a wider range than purple nutsedge in the temperate areas, primarily because yellow nutsedge can tolerate colder by: (Reflex) 2 EC 14 Broadleaves and yellow/purple nutsedge.

Suppression of some annual and perennial grasses. Label is a 24(C) local indemnified label and a waiver of liability must be signed for use. Transplanted crop only. May be applied to bareground production 7 days before transplanting or to a formed bed but prior to laying plastic.

The growth of both nutsedge species responded positively to elevated CO 2, purple nutsedge had increased shoot and root dry weights and yellow nutsedge had increased shoot, root, and tuber dry weights and counts. Few treatment differences were observed among the herbicides at any of the rates by: AN ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS OF A.

Amerasinghe for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Horticulture presented on July 9. Title: Modeling Purple Nutsedge (Cypems mtundus L.) Growth: Preliminary Evaluation of Light Intensity. A study was made to investigate the effects of native endomycorrhizal fungi, soil flooding and nurse plant (onion) on the mycorrhizal status, growth and phosphorus (P) uptake of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.).Cited by:   Purple nutsedge is a nonnative weed of agricultural regions, particularly in the coastal plains of the southern United States, where the soil does not frequently freeze (Bryson and DeFelice ).A persistent weed of multiple crops throughout the world (Holm et al.

), purple nutsedge is among one of the most difficult to control in vegetable and agronomic Cited by: 1.Background and aims. Purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) is a major weed of upland crops and ly, a flood-tolerant ecotype evolved as a serious weed in lowland rice.

This study attempted to establish the putative growth and physiological features that led to Cited by: 9.